spirit posteets tagged bash

 

  • 3 years ago
    1. mysqldump –add-drop-table –extended-insert –force –log-error=error.log -uUSER -pPASS OLD_DB_NAME | ssh -C user@newhost “mysql -uUSER -pPASS NEW_DB_NAME”
  • 3 years ago
    1. export PROMPT_COMMAND=“${PROMPT_COMMAND:+$PROMPT_COMMAND ; }”‘echo $$ $USER “$(history 1)”|logger -p user.alert -t bash_history’
    2. readonly PROMPT_COMMAND
  • 3 years ago
    1. FILE SPACING:
    2.  # double space a file
    3.  sed G
    4.  # double space a file which already has blank lines in it. Output file
    5.  # should contain no more than one blank line between lines of text.
    6.  sed ‘/^$/d;G’
    7.  # triple space a file
    8.  sed ‘G;G’
    9.  # undo double-spacing (assumes even-numbered lines are always blank)
    10.  sed ‘n;d’
    11.  # insert a blank line above every line which matches “regex”
    12.  sed ‘/regex/{x;p;x;}’
    13.  # insert a blank line below every line which matches “regex”
    14.  sed ‘/regex/G’
    15.  # insert a blank line above and below every line which matches “regex”
    16.  sed ‘/regex/{x;p;x;G;}’
    17. NUMBERING:
    18.  # number each line of a file (simple left alignment). Using a tab (see
    19.  # note on ‘t’ at end of file) instead of space will preserve margins.
    20.  sed = filename | sed ‘N;s/n/t/’
    21.  # number each line of a file (number on left, right-aligned)
    22.  sed = filename | sed ‘N; s/^/     /; s/ *(.{6,})n/1  /’
    23.  # number each line of file, but only print numbers if line is not blank
    24.  sed ‘/./=’ filename | sed ‘/./N; s/n/ /’
    25.  # count lines (emulates “wc -l”)
    26.  sed -n ‘$=’
    27. TEXT CONVERSION AND SUBSTITUTION:
    28.  # IN UNIX ENVIRONMENT: convert DOS newlines (CR/LF) to Unix format.
    29.  sed ‘s/.$//’               # assumes that all lines end with CR/LF
    30.  sed ‘s/^M$//’              # in bash/tcsh, press Ctrl-V then Ctrl-M
    31.  sed ‘s/x0D$//’            # works on ssed, gsed 3.02.80 or higher
    32.  # IN UNIX ENVIRONMENT: convert Unix newlines (LF) to DOS format.
    33.  sed “s/$/`echo -e r`/”            # command line under ksh
    34.  sed ‘s/$’“/`echo r`/”             # command line under bash
    35.  sed “s/$/`echo r`/”               # command line under zsh
    36.  sed ‘s/$/r/’                        # gsed 3.02.80 or higher
    37.  # IN DOS ENVIRONMENT: convert Unix newlines (LF) to DOS format.
    38.  sed “s/$//”                          # method 1
    39.  sed -n p                             # method 2
    40.  # IN DOS ENVIRONMENT: convert DOS newlines (CR/LF) to Unix format.
    41.  # Can only be done with UnxUtils sed, version 4.0.7 or higher. The
    42.  # UnxUtils version can be identified by the custom “–text” switch
    43.  # which appears when you use the “–help” switch. Otherwise, changing
    44.  # DOS newlines to Unix newlines cannot be done with sed in a DOS
    45.  # environment. Use “tr” instead.
    46.  sed “s/r//” infile >outfile         # UnxUtils sed v4.0.7 or higher
    47.  tr -d r <infile >outfile            # GNU tr version 1.22 or higher
    48.  # delete leading whitespace (spaces, tabs) from front of each line
    49.  # aligns all text flush left
    50.  sed ‘s/^[ t]*//’                    # see note on ‘t’ at end of file
    51.  # delete trailing whitespace (spaces, tabs) from end of each line
    52.  sed ‘s/[ t]*$//’                    # see note on ‘t’ at end of file
    53.  # delete BOTH leading and trailing whitespace from each line
    54.  sed ‘s/^[ t]*//;s/[ t]*$//’
    55.  # insert 5 blank spaces at beginning of each line (make page offset)
    56.  sed ‘s/^/     /’
    57.  # align all text flush right on a 79-column width
    58.  sed -e :a -e ‘s/^.{1,78}$/ &/;ta’  # set at 78 plus 1 space
    59.  # center all text in the middle of 79-column width. In method 1,
    60.  # spaces at the beginning of the line are significant, and trailing
    61.  # spaces are appended at the end of the line. In method 2, spaces at
    62.  # the beginning of the line are discarded in centering the line, and
    63.  # no trailing spaces appear at the end of lines.
    64.  sed  -e :a -e ‘s/^.{1,77}$/ & /;ta’                     # method 1
    65.  sed  -e :a -e ‘s/^.{1,77}$/ &/;ta’ -e ‘s/( *)1/1/’  # method 2
    66.  # substitute (find and replace) “foo” with “bar” on each line
    67.  sed ‘s/foo/bar/’             # replaces only 1st instance in a line
    68.  sed ‘s/foo/bar/4’            # replaces only 4th instance in a line
    69.  sed ‘s/foo/bar/g’            # replaces ALL instances in a line
    70.  sed ‘s/(.*)foo(.*foo)/1bar2/’ # replace the next-to-last case
    71.  sed ‘s/(.*)foo/1bar/’            # replace only the last case
    72.  # substitute “foo” with “bar” ONLY for lines which contain “baz”
    73.  sed ‘/baz/s/foo/bar/g’
    74.  # substitute “foo” with “bar” EXCEPT for lines which contain “baz”
    75.  sed ‘/baz/!s/foo/bar/g’
    76.  # change “scarlet” or “ruby” or “puce” to “red”
    77.  sed ‘s/scarlet/red/g;s/ruby/red/g;s/puce/red/g’   # most seds
    78.  gsed ‘s/scarlet|ruby|puce/red/g’                # GNU sed only
    79.  # reverse order of lines (emulates “tac”)
    80.  # bug/feature in HHsed v1.5 causes blank lines to be deleted
    81.  sed ‘1!G;h;$!d’               # method 1
    82.  sed -n ‘1!G;h;$p’             # method 2
    83.  # reverse each character on the line (emulates “rev”)
    84.  sed ‘/n/!G;s/(.)(.*n)/&21/;//D;s/.//’
    85.  # join pairs of lines side-by-side (like “paste”)
    86.  sed ‘$!N;s/n/ /’
    87.  # if a line ends with a backslash, append the next line to it
    88.  sed -e :a -e ‘/$/N; s/n//; ta’
    89.  # if a line begins with an equal sign, append it to the previous line
    90.  # and replace the “=” with a single space
    91.  sed -e :a -e ‘$!N;s/n=/ /;ta’ -e ‘P;D’
    92.  # add commas to numeric strings, changing “1234567” to “1,234,567”
    93.  gsed ‘:a;s/B[0-9]{3}>/,&/;ta’                     # GNU sed
    94.  sed -e :a -e ‘s/(.*[0-9])([0-9]{3})/1,2/;ta’  # other seds
    95.  # add commas to numbers with decimal points and minus signs (GNU sed)
    96.  gsed -r ‘:a;s/(^|[^0-9.])([0-9]+)([0-9]{3})/12,3/g;ta’
    97.  # add a blank line every 5 lines (after lines 5, 10, 15, 20, etc.)
    98.  gsed ‘0~5G’                  # GNU sed only
    99.  sed ‘n;n;n;n;G;’             # other seds
    100. SELECTIVE PRINTING OF CERTAIN LINES:
    101.  # print first 10 lines of file (emulates behavior of “head”)
    102.  sed 10q
    103.  # print first line of file (emulates “head -1”)
    104.  sed q
    105.  # print the last 10 lines of a file (emulates “tail”)
    106.  sed -e :a -e ‘$q;N;11,$D;ba’
    107.  # print the last 2 lines of a file (emulates “tail -2”)
    108.  sed ‘$!N;$!D’
    109.  # print the last line of a file (emulates “tail -1”)
    110.  sed ‘$!d’                    # method 1
    111.  sed -n ‘$p’                  # method 2
    112.  # print the next-to-the-last line of a file
    113.  sed -e ‘$!{h;d;}’ -e x              # for 1-line files, print blank line
    114.  sed -e ‘1{$q;}’ -e ‘$!{h;d;}’ -e x  # for 1-line files, print the line
    115.  sed -e ‘1{$d;}’ -e ‘$!{h;d;}’ -e x  # for 1-line files, print nothing
    116.  # print only lines which match regular expression (emulates “grep”)
    117.  sed -n ‘/regexp/p’           # method 1
    118.  sed ‘/regexp/!d’             # method 2
    119.  # print only lines which do NOT match regexp (emulates “grep -v”)
    120.  sed -n ‘/regexp/!p’          # method 1, corresponds to above
    121.  sed ‘/regexp/d’              # method 2, simpler syntax
    122.  # print the line immediately before a regexp, but not the line
    123.  # containing the regexp
    124.  sed -n ‘/regexp/{g;1!p;};h’
    125.  # print the line immediately after a regexp, but not the line
    126.  # containing the regexp
    127.  sed -n ‘/regexp/{n;p;}’
    128.  # print 1 line of context before and after regexp, with line number
    129.  # indicating where the regexp occurred (similar to “grep -A1 -B1”)
    130.  sed -n -e ‘/regexp/{=;x;1!p;g;$!N;p;D;}’ -e h
    131.  # grep for AAA and BBB and CCC (in any order)
    132.  sed ‘/AAA/!d; /BBB/!d; /CCC/!d’
    133.  # grep for AAA and BBB and CCC (in that order)
    134.  sed ‘/AAA.*BBB.*CCC/!d’
    135.  # grep for AAA or BBB or CCC (emulates “egrep”)
    136.  sed -e ‘/AAA/b’ -e ‘/BBB/b’ -e ‘/CCC/b’ -e d    # most seds
    137.  gsed ‘/AAA|BBB|CCC/!d’                        # GNU sed only
    138.  # print paragraph if it contains AAA (blank lines separate paragraphs)
    139.  # HHsed v1.5 must insert a ‘G;’ after ‘x;’ in the next 3 scripts below
    140.  sed -e ‘/./{H;$!d;}’ -e ‘x;/AAA/!d;’
    141.  # print paragraph if it contains AAA and BBB and CCC (in any order)
    142.  sed -e ‘/./{H;$!d;}’ -e ‘x;/AAA/!d;/BBB/!d;/CCC/!d’
    143.  # print paragraph if it contains AAA or BBB or CCC
    144.  sed -e ‘/./{H;$!d;}’ -e ‘x;/AAA/b’ -e ‘/BBB/b’ -e ‘/CCC/b’ -e d
    145.  gsed ‘/./{H;$!d;};x;/AAA|BBB|CCC/b;d’         # GNU sed only
    146.  # print only lines of 65 characters or longer
    147.  sed -n ‘/^.{65}/p’
    148.  # print only lines of less than 65 characters
    149.  sed -n ‘/^.{65}/!p’        # method 1, corresponds to above
    150.  sed ‘/^.{65}/d’            # method 2, simpler syntax
    151.  # print section of file from regular expression to end of file
    152.  sed -n ‘/regexp/,$p’
    153.  # print section of file based on line numbers (lines 8-12, inclusive)
    154.  sed -n ‘8,12p’               # method 1
    155.  sed ‘8,12!d’                 # method 2
    156.  # print line number 52
    157.  sed -n ’52p’                 # method 1
    158.  sed ’52!d’                   # method 2
    159.  sed ’52q;d’                  # method 3, efficient on large files
    160.  # beginning at line 3, print every 7th line
    161.  gsed -n ‘3~7p’               # GNU sed only
    162.  sed -n ‘3,${p;n;n;n;n;n;n;}’ # other seds
    163.  # print section of file between two regular expressions (inclusive)
    164.  sed -n ‘/Iowa/,/Montana/p’             # case sensitive
    165. SELECTIVE DELETION OF CERTAIN LINES:
    166.  # print all of file EXCEPT section between 2 regular expressions
    167.  sed ‘/Iowa/,/Montana/d’
    168.  # delete duplicate, consecutive lines from a file (emulates “uniq”).
    169.  # First line in a set of duplicate lines is kept, rest are deleted.
    170.  sed ‘$!N; /^(.*)n1$/!P; D’
    171.  # delete duplicate, nonconsecutive lines from a file. Beware not to
    172.  # overflow the buffer size of the hold space, or else use GNU sed.
    173.  sed -n ‘G; s/n/&&/; /^([ -~]*n).*n1/d; s/n//; h; P’
    174.  # delete all lines except duplicate lines (emulates “uniq -d”).
    175.  sed ‘$!N; s/^(.*)n1$/1/; t; D’
    176.  # delete the first 10 lines of a file
    177.  sed ‘1,10d’
    178.  # delete the last line of a file
    179.  sed ‘$d’
    180.  # delete the last 2 lines of a file
    181.  sed ‘N;$!P;$!D;$d’
    182.  # delete the last 10 lines of a file
    183.  sed -e :a -e ‘$d;N;2,10ba’ -e ‘P;D’   # method 1
    184.  sed -n -e :a -e ‘1,10!{P;N;D;};N;ba’  # method 2
    185.  # delete every 8th line
    186.  gsed ‘0~8d’                           # GNU sed only
    187.  sed ‘n;n;n;n;n;n;n;d;’                # other seds
    188.  # delete lines matching pattern
    189.  sed ‘/pattern/d’
    190.  # delete ALL blank lines from a file (same as “grep ‘.’ “)
    191.  sed ‘/^$/d’                           # method 1
    192.  sed ‘/./!d’                           # method 2
    193.  # delete all CONSECUTIVE blank lines from file except the first; also
    194.  # deletes all blank lines from top and end of file (emulates “cat -s”)
    195.  sed ‘/./,/^$/!d’          # method 1, allows 0 blanks at top, 1 at EOF
    196.  sed ‘/^$/N;/n$/D’        # method 2, allows 1 blank at top, 0 at EOF
    197.  # delete all CONSECUTIVE blank lines from file except the first 2:
    198.  sed ‘/^$/N;/n$/N;//D’
    199.  # delete all leading blank lines at top of file
    200.  sed ‘/./,$!d’
    201.  # delete all trailing blank lines at end of file
    202.  sed -e :a -e ‘/^n*$/{$d;N;ba’ -e ‘}’  # works on all seds
    203.  sed -e :a -e ‘/^n*$/N;/n$/ba’        # ditto, except for gsed 3.02.*
    204.  # delete the last line of each paragraph
    205.  sed -n ‘/^$/{p;h;};/./{x;/./p;}’
    206. SPECIAL APPLICATIONS:
    207.  # remove nroff overstrikes (char, backspace) from man pages. The ‘echo’
    208.  # command may need an -e switch if you use Unix System V or bash shell.
    209.  sed “s/.`echo b`//g”    # double quotes required for Unix environment
    210.  sed ‘s/.^H//g’             # in bash/tcsh, press Ctrl-V and then Ctrl-H
    211.  sed ‘s/.x08//g’           # hex expression for sed 1.5, GNU sed, ssed
    212.  # get Usenet/e-mail message header
    213.  sed ‘/^$/q’                # deletes everything after first blank line
    214.  # get Usenet/e-mail message body
    215.  sed ‘1,/^$/d’              # deletes everything up to first blank line
    216.  # get Subject header, but remove initial “Subject: ” portion
    217.  sed ‘/^Subject: */!d; s///;q’
    218.  # get return address header
    219.  sed ‘/^Reply-To:/q; /^From:/h; /./d;g;q’
    220.  # parse out the address proper. Pulls out the e-mail address by itself
    221.  # from the 1-line return address header (see preceding script)
    222.  sed ‘s/ *(.*)//; s/>.*//; s/.*[:<] *//’
    223.  # add a leading angle bracket and space to each line (quote a message)
    224.  sed ‘s/^/> /’
    225.  # delete leading angle bracket & space from each line (unquote a message)
    226.  sed ‘s/^> //’
    227.  # remove most HTML tags (accommodates multiple-line tags)
    228.  sed -e :a -e ‘s/<[^>]*>//g;/</N;//ba’
    229.  # extract multi-part uuencoded binaries, removing extraneous header
    230.  # info, so that only the uuencoded portion remains. Files passed to
    231.  # sed must be passed in the proper order. Version 1 can be entered
    232.  # from the command line; version 2 can be made into an executable
    233.  # Unix shell script. (Modified from a script by Rahul Dhesi.)
    234.  sed ‘/^end/,/^begin/d’ file1 file2 … fileX | uudecode   # vers. 1
    235.  sed ‘/^end/,/^begin/d’ “$@” | uudecode                    # vers. 2
    236.  # sort paragraphs of file alphabetically. Paragraphs are separated by blank
    237.  # lines. GNU sed uses v for vertical tab, or any unique char will do.
    238.  sed ‘/./{H;d;};x;s/n/={NL}=/g’ file | sort | sed ‘1s/={NL}=//;s/={NL}=/n/g’
    239.  gsed ‘/./{H;d};x;y/n/v/’ file | sort | sed ‘1s/v//;y/v/n/’
    240.  # zip up each .TXT file individually, deleting the source file and
    241.  # setting the name of each .ZIP file to the basename of the .TXT file
    242.  # (under DOS: the “dir /b” switch returns bare filenames in all caps).
    243.  echo @echo off >zipup.bat
    244.  dir /b *.txt | sed “s/^(.*).TXT/pkzip -mo 1 1.TXT/” >>zipup.bat
  • 3 years ago
    1. echo $((RANDOM%256)).$((RANDOM%256)).$((RANDOM%256)).$((RANDOM%256))
  • 3 years ago
    1. date +%s
  • 4 years ago
    1. #Linux
    2. for ip in $(seq 1 254); do ping -c 1 192.168.1.$ip>/dev/null; [ $? -eq 0 ] && echo “192.168.1.$ip UP” || : ; done
    3. #Windows:
    4. for /L %I in (1,1,254) DO pingw 30 -n 1 192.168.1.%I | find “Reply”
  • 5 years ago
    find / -mtime 2 -o -ctime 2
  • 5 years ago
    1. find / -perm -0002type d -print
    2. find / -perm -0002type f -print
  • 5 years ago
    Great for finding effects of make install
    1. find / -cmin -5
  • 5 years ago
    1. find / –size +10000000c –printf “%15s %pn”